Wednesday, Oct 27

After an impressive showing at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in his first race of 2017, Ryan Preece will score the victory in his second start of 2017 at Iowa Speedway.

“I don’t even know what to say. I got to thank everybody, just everybody involved. I am so lost for words. I don’t know what to say. I am at a lost for words. This is what emotion is. I thought this race would never end, but nothing will beat today,” said Preece

This is Preece’s first NASCAR national series win of his career. He has an average finish in 2017 of 1.5.

Kyle Benjamin finished second.

In his first start of 2017 in the NASCAR Xfinity Series, Brian Scott finished third.

Brennan Poole, Cole Custer, JJ Yeley, Daniel Hemric, Blake Koch, William Byron, and Brandon Jones rounded out the top-five.

The time of race was two hours, 17 minutes, and 37 seconds. The average speed was 96.900 mph. There were seven cautions for 40 laps. There were four lead changes among four different drivers.

Next up for the NASCAR Xfinity Series is a trip to Watkins Glen International for the Zippo 200 at the Glen on August 5th at 2:00 p.m. ET on NBCSN and Motor Racing Network.

For the fourth time in 2017 and the fallout of teammates, Christopher Bell won the Overton’s 150 after a late race battle for the lead.


“My guys do the best. They do a good job taking care of me. I just can’t say enough to be able to drive for Kyle Busch Motorsports. I am glad to be able to get SiriusXM into victory lane,” said Bell.

 

Despite a late race charge and a strong run at Pocono after a few disappointing weeks, Ben Rhodes will finished second.

 

“Pretty mellow about it. I guess that has been the story of the day. There were several situations out that we could have put ourselves in a bad place. I let a couple guys go early on in the race. I knew we had a fast Safelight Tundra,” said Rhodes.

 

Running up front for majority of the day, Ryan Truex finished in the third position.

 

John Hunter Nemchek, Johnny Suater, Matt Crafton, Austin Cindric, Cody Coughlin, Chase Briscoe, and Justin Haley round out the top-10.

 

There were five lead changes among five different drivers. The caution flew four times for XX laps. The average speed was 119.210 mph. The time of race was one hour, 17 minutes, 37 seconds.

 

Next up for the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series is a trip to Michigan International Raceway on August 12th for the LTI Printing 200. The race will be broadcasted on Fox Sports 1 and Motor Racing Network at 1:00 p.m. ET.

Following an altercation on pit road, Joe Gibbs Racing (JGR) has suspended Lee Cunningham and Chris Taylor, pit crew members on Martin Truex Jr.'s car.

 

The altercation took place after Truex and Kyle Busch wrecked each other coming off the second turn at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Lap 112.

 

NASCAR on FOX was the first to report the incident:

 

 

Barney Visser, Furntiture Row Racing (FRR) owner, released a statement following the announcement:

 

"Our No. 78 pit crew is hired, trained and managed by Joe Gibbs Racing. They are one of the best pit crews on the circuit and have kept us up front all season. We admire the talent and dedication of our pit crew and support all of the decisions and actions taken by Joe Gibbs Racing."

 

Kip Wolfmeier and John Royer will take their respective positions during the suspensions of Cunningham and Taylor.

 

FRR and JGR have a technical alliance. Both teams share technical information, pit crews, and car chassis.

INDIANAPOLIS— After a wild and crazy Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer, was made available to the media to discuss the final moments of the event and other pressing issues.

As darkness loomed over the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the Brickyard 400 went into double overtime. As sunset approached, the second attempt at NASCAR Overtime ended the event.

The problem for many was that the cars were wrecking well before the overtime line before NASCAR threw the caution flag. Ultimately NASCAR threw the caution flag after race winner, Kasey Kahne crossed the overtime line.

“What we have always said and been consistent, as much as I talked about it, we are going to make every attempt to finish the race under green. To do that, you have to see what happens with an incident,” said O’Donnell. “In this case, we did that. Once we decided to throw the caution when we wanted to dispatch equipment, we also knew there was oil on the race track, and threw the caution. Ultimately, that was the end of the race.”

When asked if darkness played a factor into the decision, O’Donnell stated, “It didn’t, but we would not have been able to restart that race. There was oil down. It would have been another red flag. I think the last red flags were 15 to 20 minutes with oil. We were up against it as well.”

O’Donnell clarified that when the leader crosses the overtime line and the caution falls, that the race was official.

As NASCAR finished close to darkness, O’Donell stated that they have not discussed the start times of the event.

During the final red flag period of the race, NASCAR parked Landon Cassill of Front Row Motorsports for driving under the red flag. Cassill’s spotter did not hear the call from the NASCAR official that the red flag has been displayed. O’Donnell was unsure of what the specific reason was behind the call.

“We checked with the spotters. We made sure the sight lines were still good. Obviously, if you continued to have cautions and red flags, that would have been a problem, but we wanted to make every attempt to go back green. The cleanup did a great job to get us back going,” said O’Donnell about the looming darkness.

NASCAR is expected to show photo proof that the leaders were in fact across the overtime line at the time of caution.

Don’t like the overtime line rule? O’Donnell mentioned that the sanctioning body is in discussions about potentially moving the overtime line to the start/finish line in the future.

INDIANAPOLIS— In his final voyage to Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the Brickyard 400, the day for Dale Earnhardt Jr finished on a sad note. Earnhardt Jr was sidelined only 76 laps into the 160 lap event.

The day ended prematurely after damage concurred to the radiator. Earnhardt made contact to the rear of Trevor Bayne. Shortly after contact, smoke billowed from the front of the Earnhardt’s damages car. Earnhardt took the car straight to the garage.

Earlier in the race, Earnhardt had contact with Brad Keselowski. At that impact, the bumper bar was knocked out of the car resulting in no protection for the radiator.

“We had a great car and I was having a lot of fun. The car was fast. We had a top 10 car for sure. It’s kind of frustrating because I was really enjoying being out there,” said Earnhardt. “Hopefully our luck’s going to turnaround. It’s been pretty tough and this is a difficult one to put up with.”

Earnhardt’s accident in the Brickyard 400 came when the race was restarting.

“You’ve got to push hard and that got us in a little bit of trouble there when they all started checking up on the outside. I was just trying real hard to get as much as we could on restart, and we got bit,” said Earnhardt.

Earnhardt’s not the only Hendrick driver to have retired from the event. Chase Elliott retired from the event earlier on due to engine issues. Earnhardt will be credited with a 36th place finish.

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